Humainquivolepas

rosslynpaladin:

themightycaboose:

Question raised on facebook got no response, so I’ll open it up to a wider audience. 

Has anyone else with communication differences/disorders had problems with getting university disability services to accept that, and adjust how they communicate with you? If so, have you resolved it? And if you have, how?

My school’s Accessibility Center is, of course, designed to help hearing/vision impaired or physically impaired students-

they can do nearly nothing for ASD students except give us a letter that says, “Yes she is autistic and is not making it up for attention or priviliges, no you cannot take points off her for asking questions she needs to ask, yes she needs to be allowed to use her phone and tablet as assistive tech, and if you don’t believe her, you can deal with us.”

They know I have communication problems related to things like teachers who shout, teachers with accents, and teachers with issues speaking in full sentences or articulate speech. There is NOTHING they can do about any of that. So I handle it myself.

I start a class, and either I let the teacher know I can’t hear them because of room fans, or I wear ear filters because a teacher shouts, or I sit in silence and grind my teeth because a teacher takes 5 minutes to form a coherent sentence…. or I drop the class and try again.

My college experience is mostly me playing the college roulette of “Is this teacher going to make passing this class easy, hard or impossible?” 

My success in college depends almost entirely on this little “game”. Not my ability to do the course. Not my ability to understand the subject. 

But my ability to negotiate the minefield that is college professors and their “little idiosyncracies”.

ajax-daughter-of-telamon:

queenshulamit:

rapidfireinfinity:

spacious-infinity:

lovejoyjohnlock:

daniel-rosenfeld:

sunbleached-jacket:

c-a-bergamot:

redbloodedamerica:

liberallogic101:

#CommonCore This is how the Government gets the unemployment rate.



What. The. Fuck. Is. This. Shit.

what “progressive” education in america is turning into.

THE FUCK’S THIS SHIT

what the hell is that supposed to even mean? I had to read over the explanation twice, and I’m taking algebra 2. 

I’m taking fucking Calculus and I don’t get what the teacher is trying to do.
8+5=13. You can’t take 2 out of 5 and have 3 left over and just sitting in the side with nowhere to go. Math doesn’t work like that. AND, MR OR MRS TEACHER, YOU CERTAINLY CAN’T ADD 3 TO 8+2 BECAUSE YOU STILL GET 13
YOU ALREADY DID 8+2=10 YOU GOT 10 WHY DO YOU ADD 3?! YOU WON’T HAVE 10 ANYMORE YOU’LL HAVE 13
WHICH IS WHAT 8+5 IS SUPPOSED TO FUCKING EQUAL
GODDAMMIT

MATH WAS ALREADY HARD ENOUGH FOR ME GROWING UP I WOULD BE IN TEARS WITH THIS SHIT

????????????????????????????????????????????????Is this real though? Do we have a source for this?I mean if it is real then this teaching method sucks but maybe someone made this up? I just find it hard to believe that aything this obviously stupid is real.

There are some posts explaining what’s going on with this question, which is worded very confusingly to someone who was not taught this technique (it’s a way to break down addition problems into more steps, by adding up to the nearest multiple of 10 and then seeing how much further you have to go. I was not taught to do that so it was very confusing to me at first, but when I read the posts I got it.)
Lemme go find them ….
one
two
three
four
five
Alas, I do not know you well enough to know what kinds of explanations work best for you, so I’m just throwing the first few I can find with what I consider an acceptable level of detail on the steps involved

oh, thanks for the explaination, it actually does make sense now

ajax-daughter-of-telamon:

queenshulamit:

rapidfireinfinity:

spacious-infinity:

lovejoyjohnlock:

daniel-rosenfeld:

sunbleached-jacket:

c-a-bergamot:

redbloodedamerica:

liberallogic101:

#CommonCore This is how the Government gets the unemployment rate.

What. The. Fuck. Is. This. Shit.

what “progressive” education in america is turning into.

THE FUCK’S THIS SHIT

what the hell is that supposed to even mean? I had to read over the explanation twice, and I’m taking algebra 2. 

I’m taking fucking Calculus and I don’t get what the teacher is trying to do.

8+5=13. You can’t take 2 out of 5 and have 3 left over and just sitting in the side with nowhere to go. Math doesn’t work like that. AND, MR OR MRS TEACHER, YOU CERTAINLY CAN’T ADD 3 TO 8+2 BECAUSE YOU STILL GET 13

YOU ALREADY DID 8+2=10 YOU GOT 10 WHY DO YOU ADD 3?! YOU WON’T HAVE 10 ANYMORE YOU’LL HAVE 13

WHICH IS WHAT 8+5 IS SUPPOSED TO FUCKING EQUAL

GODDAMMIT

MATH WAS ALREADY HARD ENOUGH FOR ME GROWING UP I WOULD BE IN TEARS WITH THIS SHIT

????????????????????????????????????????????????
Is this real though? Do we have a source for this?
I mean if it is real then this teaching method sucks but maybe someone made this up? I just find it hard to believe that aything this obviously stupid is real.

There are some posts explaining what’s going on with this question, which is worded very confusingly to someone who was not taught this technique (it’s a way to break down addition problems into more steps, by adding up to the nearest multiple of 10 and then seeing how much further you have to go. I was not taught to do that so it was very confusing to me at first, but when I read the posts I got it.)

Lemme go find them ….

one

two

three

four

five

Alas, I do not know you well enough to know what kinds of explanations work best for you, so I’m just throwing the first few I can find with what I consider an acceptable level of detail on the steps involved

oh, thanks for the explaination, it actually does make sense now

iam-fandomlocked:

Tumblr + being one hundred percent done with school’s crap

My other photosets here

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

bittergrapes:

stormingtheivory:

allacharade:

salon:

Academia is a true nightmare. 

Sorry for the click-bate-y title, but this is kind of really important. While tuition is going up, the people actually doing the teaching are being severally underpaid. What follows are some particularly upsetting excepts:

Over three quarters of college professors are adjunct. Legally, adjunct positions are part-time, at-will employment. Universities pay adjunct professors by the course, anywhere between $1,000 to $5,000. So if a professor teaches three courses in both the fall and spring semesters at a rate of $3000 per course, they’ll make $18,000 dollars. The average full-time barista makes the same yearly wage. However, a full-time adjunct works more than 40 hours a week. They’re not paid for most of those hours.

Some professors in his situation became homeless. Oliver was “fortunate” enough to only require food stamps, a fact of life for many adjuncts.

“It’s completely insane,” he said. “And this isn’t happening just to me. More and more people are doing it.”

“We have food stamps,” said the anonymous adjunct from Indiana. “We wouldn’t be able to survive without them.”

“Many professors are on food stamps and they go to food donation centers. They donate plasma. And that’s a pretty regular occurrence,” Merklein told Salon.

“As soon as they hear about you organizing, they go on the defensive,” Merklein said. “For instance, at my community college, I am being intimidated constantly and threatened in various ways, hypothetically usually. They don’t like to say something that’s an outright direct threat. … They get really freaked out when they see pamphlets around the adjunct faculty office and everyone’s wearing buttons regardless of what professional organization or union it is. They will then go on the offensive. They will usually contact their attorney who is there to protect the school as a business and to act in an anti-labor capacity.”

The most telling phrase in Merklein’s words are “the school as a business.” Colleges across the country have transitioned from bastions of intellectual enlightenment to resort hotels prizing amenities above academics. Case in point: The ludicrously extravagant gyms in America’s larger universities are home to rock climbing walls, corkscrew tracks, rooftop gardens, and a lazy river. Schools have billions to invest in housing and other on-campus projects. Schools have millions (or in some cases “mere” hundreds of thousands) to pay administrators.  Yet schools can’t find the money to hire more full-time professors. If one follows the money, it’s clear that colleges view education as tertiary. The rigor of a university’s courses doesn’t attract the awe of doe-eyed high school seniors. Lavish dorms and other luxuries do.

Anyone going to college now, consider organizing for your faculty. They are at risk of being fired for it, you are not. The university might be more willing to listen to students demanding the education they are paying for. Make noise for the people making your degree possible.

If you are touring colleges, ask what percentage of the faculty are adjucts. Ask what they are paid.

If you are not in a position to do these things, there are two petitions in the linked article to sign.

and honestly if you can read about shit like this and still be against unions I don’t know what to tell you.

Can’t wait to get my degree so I can start teaching!

I don’t remember if I talked about it here, but professors at my school were bullied and threatened for trying to organize in order to get the wages they deserve and it became a huge firestorm; they actually walked off campus for two days. They still have not been allowed to organize. The situation is pretty dire for many professors across the country and it doesn’t show any hope of getting better. And it’s not fair, because academia is an extremely important element of the infrastructure of this country - we need a highly educated workforce to compete on the global structure. And the people that create that workforce deserve to be paid a fair wage., especially because they have sacrificed a large part of their adult years to get to that position and often have huge amounts of student debt. 

my old english professor has been posting about this a lot on facebook.

emilygoddess:

appropriately-inappropriate:

tamorapierce:

boneycircus:

shodobear:

jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.
Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.
Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.
"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.
But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.
The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.
Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.
"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.
Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.
“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.
Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.
http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:
An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

All that wasted food. This is cruel.

….this logic makes no sense to homeschool kid.
If that food (that the school already bought) is so fucking precious it can get taken away from you for being short .30, wouldn’t it….go to the next kid who is paid up or…
Nawp. Whole meal in the trash.
I cannot. I am unable to can.
Murica.

When I lived in California I was too poor to go downtown for lunch, or buy candy at the machines (yeah—there’s a long time ago for you!), or eat in the cafeteria.  Then I discovered I could if I worked there.  So that’s what I did.  In Pennsylvania everybody brought their lunches, so I didn’t feel like a wart.  The San Francisco Bay Area was hard to live in if you were poor.

This is revolting. They’re denying food to children.
I read this to my mom and she cried. It’s sick.

So I can’t speak for the racial issues involved in the other examples, but this one…

The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.

…Old Town is not a wealthy community to begin with, but it’s also adjacent to Indian Island, the reservation of the Penobscot Indian Nation. As Indian Island does not have its own high school, kids from the Island attend high school in nearby towns, including Old Town (whose school mascot, for bonus fun, is the Indians). I didn’t go to Old Town High, but if it’s anything like my high school (which also receives Indian Island kids), a non-negligible number of those free lunch kids are Native American. 

this is evil

emilygoddess:

appropriately-inappropriate:

tamorapierce:

boneycircus:

shodobear:

jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.

The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”

That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.

All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?

Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.

This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.

If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.

It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:

  • An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
  • Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
  • Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
  • A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
  • The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
  • Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
  • Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

All that wasted food. This is cruel.

….this logic makes no sense to homeschool kid.

If that food (that the school already bought) is so fucking precious it can get taken away from you for being short .30, wouldn’t it….go to the next kid who is paid up or…

Nawp. Whole meal in the trash.

I cannot. I am unable to can.

Murica.

When I lived in California I was too poor to go downtown for lunch, or buy candy at the machines (yeah—there’s a long time ago for you!), or eat in the cafeteria.  Then I discovered I could if I worked there.  So that’s what I did.  In Pennsylvania everybody brought their lunches, so I didn’t feel like a wart.  The San Francisco Bay Area was hard to live in if you were poor.

This is revolting. They’re denying food to children.

I read this to my mom and she cried. It’s sick.

So I can’t speak for the racial issues involved in the other examples, but this one…

The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.

…Old Town is not a wealthy community to begin with, but it’s also adjacent to Indian Island, the reservation of the Penobscot Indian Nation. As Indian Island does not have its own high school, kids from the Island attend high school in nearby towns, including Old Town (whose school mascot, for bonus fun, is the Indians). I didn’t go to Old Town High, but if it’s anything like my high school (which also receives Indian Island kids), a non-negligible number of those free lunch kids are Native American. 

this is evil

moniquill:

meridok:

moniquill:

lezzbfriends:

Making fun of high school kids or jr. high kids that are stressed out by school is not cool. Their stress is real and a lot of them are trying their best with somewhat fewer life experiences than adults.

Also, school is fucking awful, and yes, it is probably worse than you remember it being at that age. (I may have written on this topic before: http://moniquill.tumblr.com/post/27690531114/posting-because-i-dont-have-a-radical-education-reform )

I’ve only been out of secondary school for four years and already I’ll think of how something was done at school (limited bathroom breaks, 6+ hours of class a day, etc) and get horrified because how could that have happened. How could it all have felt so /normal/ and /awful/ all at once. Like, its your entire world, its the only thing you’ve ever known… I’m in university now and as hard and awful as it can be, I still think back to high school and feel vaguely nauseous.

Funny story. When I was in middle school, we were taught a unit on 1984. And I remember thinking, at the time, that Winston just needed to suck it the fuck up and quit whining about it because seriously he had way more personal freedoms than I did. It was presented to us in the ‘Introduction to Dystopia’ way, where we were supposed to be horrified at:

Big Brother watching you through the TV…while there were cameras in every classroom and hallway.

Perpetual War…while we studied middle eastern conflict in current events. While none of us could ever remember a time when there WASN’T US occupation somewhere in the middle east.

Public manipulation and propaganda…while getting disciplined for reading banned books and penalized for utilizing outside sources. (Seriously I got in trouble for having read literary analysis and basically had to have a plagiarism meeting with my teacher and some other staff because I knew too much about writing essays) while reading textbooks that had decided spin and omitted any information that wasn’t about the gumption and heroism of dead white dudes with an occasional token politically scrubbed model minority.

At least Winston Smith was allowed to travel 500 feet without a hall pass and allowed to go to the bathroom without asking. My middle school was more Orwellian than Orwell could have imagined.

All this is very important and true.

But I have a serious problem with the first video in the link, the way they used people with ADHD and talked over us.

I mean the misinformation, mention of doubt at our existence, our voices completely silenced.

WTF ???????????

What many people do not know is that the use of standardized tests has its origins in the Eugenics movement, where basic tenets assert that certain races are inferior to others biologically and intellectually.

Karen Lewis, President of the Chicago Teachers Union

Standardized testing and the Eugenics movement »

A MUST read by Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis. Standardized testing isn’t about improving education, it’s a way for the system to sort out which kids are meant to succeed and which are destined failure.

(via socialismartnature)

all this is spot on, I just have to add that the standardized testing is not the only trace of the eugenic movement remaining today. by far.
According to a new report from the Council of State Governments Justice Center, LGBT students are subject to “harsh disciplinary treatment” at three times the rate of their non-LGBT peers. In secondary schools nationwide, under 10 percent of students without disabilities were suspended, while 20 percent of students with disabilities were suspended. And students of color, including African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians have “much higher rates” of suspension than their white counterparts.
cartoonpolitics:

 “Student loans are destroying the imagination of youth. If there’s a way of a society committing mass suicide, what better way than to take all the youngest, most energetic, creative, joyous people in your society and saddle them with, like $50,000 of debt so they have to be slaves? There goes your music. There goes your culture. There goes everything new that would pop out. And in a way, this is what’s happened to our society. We’re a society that has lost any ability to incorporate the interesting, creative and eccentric people.” ~David Graeber

cartoonpolitics:

 “Student loans are destroying the imagination of youth. If there’s a way of a society committing mass suicide, what better way than to take all the youngest, most energetic, creative, joyous people in your society and saddle them with, like $50,000 of debt so they have to be slaves? There goes your music. There goes your culture. There goes everything new that would pop out. And in a way, this is what’s happened to our society. We’re a society that has lost any ability to incorporate the interesting, creative and eccentric people.” ~David Graeber

Btw for the bathroom pass thing, its only limited depending on your school. Mine used to keep a book tracking when u went in our Planners and if u went last period u couldnt go again.

clatterbane:

thecutestscribeoferebor:

clatterbane:

potootagath:

omG seeeeeeeriously????

That’s

wow

In France, I think you could go every period and no one would care??

Who’s the country of freedom now B)

And again with the micromanagement.

If it seems plausible that students would want to go and wander the halls to get out of your classroom for a little while—and this actually strikes you as more likely than a full bladder or whatever real pressing bodily need—maybe you should reevaluate what you are doing with your life. Not just in the classroom, because you are probably not a very good person anywhere else.

Never personally had them timed like that. Did have a couple of teachers who decided I couldn’t possibly need to go more than one day in a row during their class, however. Even having been told by the school nurse that I was taking meds for a pituitary tumor—at regular times—that often caused vomiting. :-| I just had to run out a few times, and got detention until my mom went and yelled at people enough. If it wouldn’t have been so mortifying at 16, I kind of wish I’d just gone ahead and barfed on their desks in front of them.

We did have one dude in high school who peed in the classroom trash can when one particularly obnoxious teacher wouldn’t let him go. That gesture went over about as well as you might expect. I’m still a bit surprised it doesn’t happen more.

I had reblogged that thing for the little joke in French but

I am now sincerely horrified by everything I’m reading around this

I didn’t mean to get that ranty, but I also got reminded of this by another discussion recently.

And it really is pretty disturbing that this is considered a totally normal way to run schools some places. To the point that you don’t necessarily realize just how messed up it is until you’re an adult. And obviously some people never do, or that behavior wouldn’t be allowed to continue. (A lot of the unbalanced authoritarian approaches to dealing with schoolkids, actually.)

My partner went through school in Sweden, and his jaw has hung open more than once when I just mentioned something like that about some fairly standard educational practices in the US. It’s that different to a lot of people’s experiences elsewhere.

clatterbane:

todbrowning:

nanokorg:

lydiasasstin:

nanokorg:

"tumblr taught me more than school did" school taught you how to fucking read

my parents taught me how to read before school even started and then the school got angry at my parents for doing ‘the schools job’

you literally stole that from to kill a mockingbird literally no school would do that unless it was the fucking 50s in alabama

why is it so hard to believe that would really happen?  my mom taught me how to read before I started school and the school actually considered holding me back because I had trouble engaging with their lessons (because they were trying to teach me something I already knew how to do)


I don’t have any trouble believing that. And I just had a couple of teachers who kept telling me to stop doing stuff because it hadn’t been covered yet. Not even that I was doing it wrong or anything, but just because they hadn’t covered it and therefore we weren’t supposed to do it at all. Reading isn’t much of a stretch from there. Unfortunately.

crown-of-weeds:

So, hey, this kid is a friend of mine, and he’s being barred from attending his local public school due to his disabilities. The school is requiring that he prove that he can independently climb the stairs to the entrance before they’ll grant him admission—which, yes, is flagrantly illegal. 

Henry’s been homeschooled for the past several years, because his district is only willing to place him in a segregated program at a different school, where he will receive an inferior and inappropriate education.

Henry is really amazing, and incredibly smart, and he wants to go to his local school. Not being able to move his body rapidly isn’t an acceptable, or legal, reason to deny him his legal right to a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment.

So, if you have a second, could you sign his petition?

tal9000:

[Image text: “my math teacher staples burger king applications to failed tests”]
babstheartist:


lost-in-the-moment:
teaching: you’re doing it right.

Because children with learning disabilities don’t exist.
Fuck that teacher yo.

Not to mention the assumption that working at Burger King is an unworthy job being just a little classist.

And also, some of those disabled people could have a condition that prevents them from working in burger king (I think it’s a job that would really be to difficult for me to do for exemple, with my sensory troubles, constant interractions with clients… having to be good at organization… not to mention how clumsy I am (I don’t know if it counts as dispraxia)
… And in general, this attitude is so shitty I mean, the clear idea here is humiliation (with like said before, a very strong classist, elitist bia) and that’s not the way you teach, shame is not the way you get people to learn something.

tal9000:

[Image text: “my math teacher staples burger king applications to failed tests”]

babstheartist:

lost-in-the-moment:

teaching: you’re doing it right.

Because children with learning disabilities don’t exist.

Fuck that teacher yo.

Not to mention the assumption that working at Burger King is an unworthy job being just a little classist.

And also, some of those disabled people could have a condition that prevents them from working in burger king (I think it’s a job that would really be to difficult for me to do for exemple, with my sensory troubles, constant interractions with clients… having to be good at organization… not to mention how clumsy I am (I don’t know if it counts as dispraxia)

… And in general, this attitude is so shitty I mean, the clear idea here is humiliation (with like said before, a very strong classist, elitist bia) and that’s not the way you teach, shame is not the way you get people to learn something.

TRANSCRIPT:
(Quote by Albert Einstein:

THE IMPORTANT THING IS NOT TO STOP QUESTIONING, CURIOSITY HAS ITS OWN REASONS FOR EXISTING.

The word curiosity is in yellow and very big, there is a picture with a purple background, the picture is showing some students one in the middle who has pigtails (seems to at least present as a girl) is raising hir hand apparently painfully, trying to get attention that doesn’t seems to be received)
nekobakaz:

the-star-stuff:

ALBERT EINSTEIN: The important thing
Credit: Gavin Aung Than

I look at this and cry a little. 
As a young student with disabilities (unknown to me, but you always know when you’re different), I have always had trouble initiating social contact, especially in school.  I remember quite clearly being taught not to ask questions by a teacher.  As a young student who rarely raised her hand to either volunteer information, answer questions, or ask questions, this had a profound effect on me, even to this day.  The few times I was curious, or tried to answer questions, I was practically humiliated in front of the class and even sent to stand in the hall.  I didn’t know what I had done wrong, other than raise my hand and speak. 
Since Grade 4, I refused to answer teacher’s questions, raise my hand or participate in class.  If I did, it was a huge feat for me, and only happened when I was absolutely sure of the answer, mainly in Grade 12.  It probably affected my ability to ask for help and my willingness to request and use accommodation, meaning my grades probably suffered.
I’m turning 27 in a little over a week; I’m still dealing with this.  It’s a bit easier, now that my classes are online.  But how I wish that never happened to me, that throughout my academic career I could have been the girl in the picture, eager to openly ask questions and learn.  I don’t think that teacher meant to hurt me like she did, but the fact remains that she did, and I’m living with the result.

I’m so sorry this happened to you.

TRANSCRIPT:

(Quote by Albert Einstein:

THE IMPORTANT THING IS NOT TO STOP QUESTIONING, CURIOSITY HAS ITS OWN REASONS FOR EXISTING.

The word curiosity is in yellow and very big, there is a picture with a purple background, the picture is showing some students one in the middle who has pigtails (seems to at least present as a girl) is raising hir hand apparently painfully, trying to get attention that doesn’t seems to be received)

nekobakaz:

the-star-stuff:

ALBERT EINSTEIN: The important thing

Credit: Gavin Aung Than

I look at this and cry a little. 

As a young student with disabilities (unknown to me, but you always know when you’re different), I have always had trouble initiating social contact, especially in school.  I remember quite clearly being taught not to ask questions by a teacher.  As a young student who rarely raised her hand to either volunteer information, answer questions, or ask questions, this had a profound effect on me, even to this day.  The few times I was curious, or tried to answer questions, I was practically humiliated in front of the class and even sent to stand in the hall.  I didn’t know what I had done wrong, other than raise my hand and speak. 

Since Grade 4, I refused to answer teacher’s questions, raise my hand or participate in class.  If I did, it was a huge feat for me, and only happened when I was absolutely sure of the answer, mainly in Grade 12.  It probably affected my ability to ask for help and my willingness to request and use accommodation, meaning my grades probably suffered.

I’m turning 27 in a little over a week; I’m still dealing with this.  It’s a bit easier, now that my classes are online.  But how I wish that never happened to me, that throughout my academic career I could have been the girl in the picture, eager to openly ask questions and learn.  I don’t think that teacher meant to hurt me like she did, but the fact remains that she did, and I’m living with the result.

I’m so sorry this happened to you.

Help one of my students pay for their AP exam! Thank you!!

private-revolution:

inothernews:

Fellow Tumblrers — please feel free to help Ray and his students out, if you can!

detroitsomething:

Dear followers, teachers, and the Tumblr #education community,

My name is Ray Stoeser and I am a second year English teacher at Crockett Technical High School in Detroit, MI.  This year I had the amazing opportunity to be the AP Language and Composition instructor for our school.  I work with some of the most amazing students you could meet.  Their hunger, passion, and dedication to their education is truly special.  

At the beginning of the year, the school told me they would be covering the cost of the AP exams.  We are a high poverty school and even the reduced $57 fee per exam is hefty for some of our students’ families.  When the time came to order the exams, I was informed that the school was out of funds and would be unable to pay for the exams.  I was heartbroken.  How was I going to tell my 22 students that they were not going to take the exam for which they had worked so hard to prepare?  

I couldn’t.  

With less than 24 hours before we had to order the exams, I told the administration to order all 22 exams.  College Board wasn’t going to send the bill until mid-June so that gave me some time to find some donations.  

On May 16th the students took their exams and returned to my class excited and confident about their results!

That being said, we still need to pay the bill.  My class and I are accepting donations and/or sponsors for the exams.  I have 22 students and the exams are $57 each.  We would graciously accept any denomination.  Also, if you would like to pick one of the 22 students and sponsor their individual exam with a $57 donation that student would be happy to send you a personalized “thank you.”

Here are some of the students you would be helping!

To donate please click here.

Class Roster

  • Demetria
  • Charles
  • Davina
  • Tyquan
  • Derek
  • Andrea
  • Curtia
  • Paula
  • Dakharia
  • Khalid
  • Khalil
  • Leon
  • Desmond
  • Taja
  • Equan
  • Ariel
  • Shayla
  • Capri
  • Deshont’A
  • Tara
  • D’Nika
  • Mack

Thank you for helping these students take one step closer to college!!!

If you have any questions and/or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to me.

raymond.stoeser@detroitk12.org

raystoeser@gmail.com

To donate please click here.

Putting this on my to do list, signal boosting too