Humainquivolepas
According to a new report from the Council of State Governments Justice Center, LGBT students are subject to “harsh disciplinary treatment” at three times the rate of their non-LGBT peers. In secondary schools nationwide, under 10 percent of students without disabilities were suspended, while 20 percent of students with disabilities were suspended. And students of color, including African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians have “much higher rates” of suspension than their white counterparts.
cartoonpolitics:

 “Student loans are destroying the imagination of youth. If there’s a way of a society committing mass suicide, what better way than to take all the youngest, most energetic, creative, joyous people in your society and saddle them with, like $50,000 of debt so they have to be slaves? There goes your music. There goes your culture. There goes everything new that would pop out. And in a way, this is what’s happened to our society. We’re a society that has lost any ability to incorporate the interesting, creative and eccentric people.” ~David Graeber

cartoonpolitics:

 “Student loans are destroying the imagination of youth. If there’s a way of a society committing mass suicide, what better way than to take all the youngest, most energetic, creative, joyous people in your society and saddle them with, like $50,000 of debt so they have to be slaves? There goes your music. There goes your culture. There goes everything new that would pop out. And in a way, this is what’s happened to our society. We’re a society that has lost any ability to incorporate the interesting, creative and eccentric people.” ~David Graeber

Btw for the bathroom pass thing, its only limited depending on your school. Mine used to keep a book tracking when u went in our Planners and if u went last period u couldnt go again.

clatterbane:

thecutestscribeoferebor:

clatterbane:

potootagath:

omG seeeeeeeriously????

That’s

wow

In France, I think you could go every period and no one would care??

Who’s the country of freedom now B)

And again with the micromanagement.

If it seems plausible that students would want to go and wander the halls to get out of your classroom for a little while—and this actually strikes you as more likely than a full bladder or whatever real pressing bodily need—maybe you should reevaluate what you are doing with your life. Not just in the classroom, because you are probably not a very good person anywhere else.

Never personally had them timed like that. Did have a couple of teachers who decided I couldn’t possibly need to go more than one day in a row during their class, however. Even having been told by the school nurse that I was taking meds for a pituitary tumor—at regular times—that often caused vomiting. :-| I just had to run out a few times, and got detention until my mom went and yelled at people enough. If it wouldn’t have been so mortifying at 16, I kind of wish I’d just gone ahead and barfed on their desks in front of them.

We did have one dude in high school who peed in the classroom trash can when one particularly obnoxious teacher wouldn’t let him go. That gesture went over about as well as you might expect. I’m still a bit surprised it doesn’t happen more.

I had reblogged that thing for the little joke in French but

I am now sincerely horrified by everything I’m reading around this

I didn’t mean to get that ranty, but I also got reminded of this by another discussion recently.

And it really is pretty disturbing that this is considered a totally normal way to run schools some places. To the point that you don’t necessarily realize just how messed up it is until you’re an adult. And obviously some people never do, or that behavior wouldn’t be allowed to continue. (A lot of the unbalanced authoritarian approaches to dealing with schoolkids, actually.)

My partner went through school in Sweden, and his jaw has hung open more than once when I just mentioned something like that about some fairly standard educational practices in the US. It’s that different to a lot of people’s experiences elsewhere.

clatterbane:

todbrowning:

nanokorg:

lydiasasstin:

nanokorg:

"tumblr taught me more than school did" school taught you how to fucking read

my parents taught me how to read before school even started and then the school got angry at my parents for doing ‘the schools job’

you literally stole that from to kill a mockingbird literally no school would do that unless it was the fucking 50s in alabama

why is it so hard to believe that would really happen?  my mom taught me how to read before I started school and the school actually considered holding me back because I had trouble engaging with their lessons (because they were trying to teach me something I already knew how to do)


I don’t have any trouble believing that. And I just had a couple of teachers who kept telling me to stop doing stuff because it hadn’t been covered yet. Not even that I was doing it wrong or anything, but just because they hadn’t covered it and therefore we weren’t supposed to do it at all. Reading isn’t much of a stretch from there. Unfortunately.

crown-of-weeds:

So, hey, this kid is a friend of mine, and he’s being barred from attending his local public school due to his disabilities. The school is requiring that he prove that he can independently climb the stairs to the entrance before they’ll grant him admission—which, yes, is flagrantly illegal. 

Henry’s been homeschooled for the past several years, because his district is only willing to place him in a segregated program at a different school, where he will receive an inferior and inappropriate education.

Henry is really amazing, and incredibly smart, and he wants to go to his local school. Not being able to move his body rapidly isn’t an acceptable, or legal, reason to deny him his legal right to a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment.

So, if you have a second, could you sign his petition?

tal9000:

[Image text: “my math teacher staples burger king applications to failed tests”]
babstheartist:


lost-in-the-moment:
teaching: you’re doing it right.

Because children with learning disabilities don’t exist.
Fuck that teacher yo.

Not to mention the assumption that working at Burger King is an unworthy job being just a little classist.

And also, some of those disabled people could have a condition that prevents them from working in burger king (I think it’s a job that would really be to difficult for me to do for exemple, with my sensory troubles, constant interractions with clients… having to be good at organization… not to mention how clumsy I am (I don’t know if it counts as dispraxia)
… And in general, this attitude is so shitty I mean, the clear idea here is humiliation (with like said before, a very strong classist, elitist bia) and that’s not the way you teach, shame is not the way you get people to learn something.

tal9000:

[Image text: “my math teacher staples burger king applications to failed tests”]

babstheartist:

lost-in-the-moment:

teaching: you’re doing it right.

Because children with learning disabilities don’t exist.

Fuck that teacher yo.

Not to mention the assumption that working at Burger King is an unworthy job being just a little classist.

And also, some of those disabled people could have a condition that prevents them from working in burger king (I think it’s a job that would really be to difficult for me to do for exemple, with my sensory troubles, constant interractions with clients… having to be good at organization… not to mention how clumsy I am (I don’t know if it counts as dispraxia)

… And in general, this attitude is so shitty I mean, the clear idea here is humiliation (with like said before, a very strong classist, elitist bia) and that’s not the way you teach, shame is not the way you get people to learn something.

TRANSCRIPT:
(Quote by Albert Einstein:

THE IMPORTANT THING IS NOT TO STOP QUESTIONING, CURIOSITY HAS ITS OWN REASONS FOR EXISTING.

The word curiosity is in yellow and very big, there is a picture with a purple background, the picture is showing some students one in the middle who has pigtails (seems to at least present as a girl) is raising hir hand apparently painfully, trying to get attention that doesn’t seems to be received)
nekobakaz:

the-star-stuff:

ALBERT EINSTEIN: The important thing
Credit: Gavin Aung Than

I look at this and cry a little. 
As a young student with disabilities (unknown to me, but you always know when you’re different), I have always had trouble initiating social contact, especially in school.  I remember quite clearly being taught not to ask questions by a teacher.  As a young student who rarely raised her hand to either volunteer information, answer questions, or ask questions, this had a profound effect on me, even to this day.  The few times I was curious, or tried to answer questions, I was practically humiliated in front of the class and even sent to stand in the hall.  I didn’t know what I had done wrong, other than raise my hand and speak. 
Since Grade 4, I refused to answer teacher’s questions, raise my hand or participate in class.  If I did, it was a huge feat for me, and only happened when I was absolutely sure of the answer, mainly in Grade 12.  It probably affected my ability to ask for help and my willingness to request and use accommodation, meaning my grades probably suffered.
I’m turning 27 in a little over a week; I’m still dealing with this.  It’s a bit easier, now that my classes are online.  But how I wish that never happened to me, that throughout my academic career I could have been the girl in the picture, eager to openly ask questions and learn.  I don’t think that teacher meant to hurt me like she did, but the fact remains that she did, and I’m living with the result.

I’m so sorry this happened to you.

TRANSCRIPT:

(Quote by Albert Einstein:

THE IMPORTANT THING IS NOT TO STOP QUESTIONING, CURIOSITY HAS ITS OWN REASONS FOR EXISTING.

The word curiosity is in yellow and very big, there is a picture with a purple background, the picture is showing some students one in the middle who has pigtails (seems to at least present as a girl) is raising hir hand apparently painfully, trying to get attention that doesn’t seems to be received)

nekobakaz:

the-star-stuff:

ALBERT EINSTEIN: The important thing

Credit: Gavin Aung Than

I look at this and cry a little. 

As a young student with disabilities (unknown to me, but you always know when you’re different), I have always had trouble initiating social contact, especially in school.  I remember quite clearly being taught not to ask questions by a teacher.  As a young student who rarely raised her hand to either volunteer information, answer questions, or ask questions, this had a profound effect on me, even to this day.  The few times I was curious, or tried to answer questions, I was practically humiliated in front of the class and even sent to stand in the hall.  I didn’t know what I had done wrong, other than raise my hand and speak. 

Since Grade 4, I refused to answer teacher’s questions, raise my hand or participate in class.  If I did, it was a huge feat for me, and only happened when I was absolutely sure of the answer, mainly in Grade 12.  It probably affected my ability to ask for help and my willingness to request and use accommodation, meaning my grades probably suffered.

I’m turning 27 in a little over a week; I’m still dealing with this.  It’s a bit easier, now that my classes are online.  But how I wish that never happened to me, that throughout my academic career I could have been the girl in the picture, eager to openly ask questions and learn.  I don’t think that teacher meant to hurt me like she did, but the fact remains that she did, and I’m living with the result.

I’m so sorry this happened to you.

Help one of my students pay for their AP exam! Thank you!!

private-revolution:

inothernews:

Fellow Tumblrers — please feel free to help Ray and his students out, if you can!

detroitsomething:

Dear followers, teachers, and the Tumblr #education community,

My name is Ray Stoeser and I am a second year English teacher at Crockett Technical High School in Detroit, MI.  This year I had the amazing opportunity to be the AP Language and Composition instructor for our school.  I work with some of the most amazing students you could meet.  Their hunger, passion, and dedication to their education is truly special.  

At the beginning of the year, the school told me they would be covering the cost of the AP exams.  We are a high poverty school and even the reduced $57 fee per exam is hefty for some of our students’ families.  When the time came to order the exams, I was informed that the school was out of funds and would be unable to pay for the exams.  I was heartbroken.  How was I going to tell my 22 students that they were not going to take the exam for which they had worked so hard to prepare?  

I couldn’t.  

With less than 24 hours before we had to order the exams, I told the administration to order all 22 exams.  College Board wasn’t going to send the bill until mid-June so that gave me some time to find some donations.  

On May 16th the students took their exams and returned to my class excited and confident about their results!

That being said, we still need to pay the bill.  My class and I are accepting donations and/or sponsors for the exams.  I have 22 students and the exams are $57 each.  We would graciously accept any denomination.  Also, if you would like to pick one of the 22 students and sponsor their individual exam with a $57 donation that student would be happy to send you a personalized “thank you.”

Here are some of the students you would be helping!

To donate please click here.

Class Roster

  • Demetria
  • Charles
  • Davina
  • Tyquan
  • Derek
  • Andrea
  • Curtia
  • Paula
  • Dakharia
  • Khalid
  • Khalil
  • Leon
  • Desmond
  • Taja
  • Equan
  • Ariel
  • Shayla
  • Capri
  • Deshont’A
  • Tara
  • D’Nika
  • Mack

Thank you for helping these students take one step closer to college!!!

If you have any questions and/or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to me.

raymond.stoeser@detroitk12.org

raystoeser@gmail.com

To donate please click here.

Putting this on my to do list, signal boosting too

Open Post

disabledtalk:

Open Post

As a part of education week here at DisabledTalk, we want to hear and share your stories and experiences of being disabled and being a student, and how those overlapped. Whether your experiences were positive or negative, whether you’re still in school or well out of it, we want to hear from you. It doesn’t matter if you submit anonymously or under a name; we’ll publish all of the submissions we get.

Submit to us here! Please title your submissions with ‘education week,’ so we can tag them appropriately.

If you have any questions, feel free to hit up our ask box.

How, then, should we measure students and teachers? In ninth grade, my students learn about the scientific method. They learn that in order to collect good data, scientists control for specific variables and test their impact on otherwise identical environments. If you give some students green fields, glossy textbooks and lots of attention, you can’t measure them against another group of students who lack all of these things. It’s bad science.

Until we provide equal educational resources to all students and teachers, no matter where they come from, we can’t say — with any scientific accuracy — how well or poorly they’re performing. Perhaps if we start the conversation there, things will start making a bit more sense.